Victory Gardens Theater Access Project

With 25 years of access services and artistic programming, The Access Project strives to celebrate the richness of disability culture both on and off the stage.

Started in 1992 by Remains Theatre, The Access Project transferred to Victory Gardens in 1995. There, it grew into a nationally recognized model outreach effort designed to involve people with disabilities in all aspects of theater. In 2008 Victory Gardens received the MetLife Foundation Award for Excellence and Innovation in Arts Access, and in 2009 we were named Most Accessible Theater by the members of Deaf Illinois.

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IS: SI    NG
Oct. 19th, 2017 at 7:30pm
Live captioning, audio description will be available.
Touch tour starting at 6:30pm will explore the unique and unexpected noise and music making instruments of the piece.

  • Artist Development Workshops, which teach the art of playwriting and performance to individuals with and without disabilities.
  • Play Development Opportunities for original works dealing with disability issues or written by playwrights who have disabilities.
  • The Access Project Presents a series of performances, readings, movies and other events that promote, explore and celebrate disability culture.

Throughout the year, the Victory Gardens Access Project designates certain performances as “Access Nights” where we offer additional accessibility services to our patrons. Read more about the services we offer below.

  • Accessible Seating: If you require wheelchair accessible and/or companion seating, or have any hearing, visual or other needs, please let us know how we may assist you with your ticket order when you contact us. If you have a service dog please let us know in advance so that we can make sure you and your canine companion have the best experience possible.
  • Assisted Listening Devices: In both of our performance spaces we provide assisted listening devices. In the Zacek McVay Theater we utilize the Sennheiser infra-red Personal Listening System. The systems provide amplification on lightweight wireless headsets and features the ability to adjust for specific hearing needs. Please contact the House Manager to receive a headset. A form of identification is required as a deposit. This system is available free of charge.
  • Audio Description: This service allows blind and low vision patrons to hear a description of the visual elements taking place on stage. Listeners will hear a description of actions, body language, lights, costumes, scenery and other aspects of the production not conveyed by voices and sounds from the stage. This service is available for specific performances.
  • Touch Tours: Available one hour and a half before each Audio Described performance. Touch Tours are one hour artistic conversations and tactile explorations of costumes, props and set pieces for patrons who are blind or low vision. Please make reservations for the Touch Tour when you order your tickets.
  • Braille Programs: Are available at the Box Office. Subscribers may reserve these on their performance
    date by calling the Box Office.
  • Large Print Programs: Are available at the Box Office. Subscribers may reserve these on their performance date by calling the Box Office.
  • American Sign Language Interpretation: For patrons who prefer American Sign Language to communicate, Victory Gardens provides ASL interpreted performances with theatrical interpreters.
  • Word for Word Captioning: Victory Gardens offers word for word captioning for select performances. At captioned performances, text is displayed on the side of the stage showing what the actors are saying and describes sound effects on stage.

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